So, I did a bit more outlining with Scrivener yesterday, and I was getting a bit of the hang of it. It’s still a bit of a process at this point, and not totally 100% natural, but it’s like anything else you know, the more you do, the easier it gets. I think it’s a good process though, and I like the way I’ve got Scrivener setup to capture some of the meta data related to scenes and sequels with POV, goal, conflict, disaster for the scenes and then reaction, dilemma, decision for the scenes. It’s the first time, that I’ve ever laid out new scenes that way, and I did get a few of them done … 6 I think. Which, I believe, should give you at least 10K words to write. I do need some more scenes. I still don’t quite have the feel for how long the scenes will be, or how specific I want them to be in the outline. I think, putting down as much info and ideas as you can when coming up with the scenes will help during the writing process, but I don’t want to hem myself in too much during the writing process. And I don’t think I will, with the way I’ve got them set up. I will still I think have the ability to come up with new ideas and diverge from the path while writing, but that Scrivener will be a good tool for keep the new stuff organized and allowing be to see the bigger picture of where the story is flowing to. And all, without being restricted. I like that. I like the idea of being able to just free flow write, kind of like I am now. But, this time, I will have some guidelines to go with the writing. I will have a goal (much like the characters) and a purpose for writing each scene. I won’t feel, like I’m meandering too much like I did for the first 75K words or so. And, I think, that is a good thing. Knowing what your trying to accomplish when writing the scene can only be helpful, and fun too I think. It’s sort of like a little challenge or puzzle your trying to fit the pieces into, and the creativity kicks in when you come up with all the little steps, that get’s your character from A to B. It’s going to be fun. I watched a documentary yesterday called tiny house, which was on the surface about people who build and live in very small homes of around 100 square feet. But, what it was really about, was the life decisions that people can make, about what is important in their lives, and how material acquisitions can come to mean so much in our society. And the question they were asking, is do you really need those things, to live a fufilling life. And of course the answer they were coming up with, was no … you really don’t. I could relate totally to a lot of what they were saying, in that how they feel living in the little houses, was much the feeling I get from living on the boat during the summer. It’s so removed from all the responsibilities and time consuming activities, that goes into owing a full sized home, and the work and time and effort that goes into it. Not to mention the expense of it all. I think it’s part of the appeal that many people experience living on sailboats, but I’ve never heard it articulated quite so succinctley the way the documentary did. The homes were about the size of sailboats, when you think about it, and they even used the same heaters you find in many sailboats. I think, that sailboats were even actually a bit smaller. Living in that way, really sort of highlights what’s important in your life, and time had to be one of the bigger. How would you use your time, if you weren’t using it to pay off a mortgage, and making the banks richer? It wasn’t lost on me, that a number of them were writers, and that they obviously found their fufillment in life from their life of writing. And, it ocured to me, that you could live in a very small physical house, but that their writing put them in a much bigger space. When your writing, you can go anywhere, and are not hemed in by four walls of any sized house. So, you could sort of have the best of both worlds. The benefits of a small footprint and less time sucked from you by your house, and the vastness of putting your head in a bigger world during your writing. Sort of cool. Although, I would prefer for my tiny house to have a sail and a keel. Oh yes, and the other thing I did yesterday, was commit to send to Emily 50K words for editing every 3 weeks. Basically, what that means, is I’ve commited to approximately an almost 200 pages novel in your series every 3 weeks. Better get to writing

TIGERBLOOD: yep DAILYMOOD: pretty good LOCATION: home office WORDSWRITTEN: none PUSHUPS: 5:00 wall sit TODO: outline write TV: Tiny Houses documentary BOOK: none GAME: none EXERCISE: none WEIGHT: 170 BREAKFAST: bacon & eggs LUNCH: big ass salad DINNER: bacon sausage, hamburger, shrimp, carrots, bell peppers, brocolli SNACKS: orange, lara bar ALCOHOL: none BEDTIME: 12:45 AWAKE: 7:00

 

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